Resilience: The Role of Reactive Critical Thinking in Bouncing Back from Disasters and Disruptors

Resilience is a form of political capital and a necessary element for health and wellbeing. A resilient democracy might weather distress, just as a resilient person might, but what are the prerequisites of such resilience? The ability of physical, political, economic, and social structures and people to bounce back from socioeconomic, political, climate-related, or healthContinue reading “Resilience: The Role of Reactive Critical Thinking in Bouncing Back from Disasters and Disruptors”

Hackable: Children’s Digital Literacy and Voluntary Disclosure

(Part 3 of series) Children and young adults spend significant time online using apps that collect massive amounts of information, but they may lack digital literacy. Schools also collect much more information than they used to. The voluntarily divulged information in an online profile plus any hackable identifiable data make children vulnerable to future andContinue reading “Hackable: Children’s Digital Literacy and Voluntary Disclosure”

Hackable: The New Privacy Ethics

(a six-post series) Privacy & Disclosure of Personal Data As people spend more time online and using apps that collect massive amounts of information, government entities grapple with how to define and protect privacy through regulation. To deem privacy waived by a click that allows access, e.g., by acknowledging cookies, seems unprincipled. But there isContinue reading “Hackable: The New Privacy Ethics”

Facial Recognition Technology in Medicine: A Use-Based Ethical Framework

Facial recognition technology is everywhere. Pew Research found more than half of adults trust law enforcement with facial recognition but fewer trust tech companies, advertisers, and landlords. The data signifies not only that the user matters, but that use matters. Tracking facial reactions to public ads and displays was the least popular use cited byContinue reading “Facial Recognition Technology in Medicine: A Use-Based Ethical Framework”

Bioethics, Robots, and The Future of Work

Self-driving cars, warehouse robots, EZ-pass, do-it-yourself check-outs, and ATMs threaten the future of work. Work and its many components including pay, atmosphere, feeling of inclusion, and empowerment are social determinants of health. Potential job loss is a valid consideration in ethical arguments to restrict the development or uses of new technologies, yet there is notContinue reading “Bioethics, Robots, and The Future of Work”

Big Data: Reconciling Privacy, Antitrust, and Data-Generating Patents

Data-Generating Patents require a broad ethical approach that incorporates business ethics. Ethics should that adhere to the spirit behind antitrust law and competition to protect consumers. Intellectual property rights are expanding. Data-generating patents can preclude competitors from obtaining, collecting, or generating the same type of data. It also deprives people of control over their dataContinue reading “Big Data: Reconciling Privacy, Antitrust, and Data-Generating Patents”

And Do the Bioethicists Understand Enough of the Science?

To be well-versed in how a discovery might impact society or a particular individual, bioethicists need to comprehend the discovery. It is hard to say how much science or technology they need to master. The more complex the discovery, the better an understanding helps in informing a solution. In the privacy sphere understanding the basicsContinue reading “And Do the Bioethicists Understand Enough of the Science?”