Brain Activity & Thoughts: Should Neuro-Rights Look Beyond the Individual?

Neuro-rights may protect people from certain harms due to neurotech advances. Neurotech has potential to improve medical treatments and revolutionize care, but there are foreseeable risks. Marcello Ienca defines neuro-rights “as the ethical, legal, social, or natural principles of freedom or entitlement related to a person’s cerebral and mental domain; that is, the fundamental normativeContinue reading “Brain Activity & Thoughts: Should Neuro-Rights Look Beyond the Individual?”

Fair Compensation for Data: Privacy, Blockchain, Ethics, and Data Science Converge

When we look at privacy, many goals converge. I separate constitutional privacy and protection from government surveillance from personal confidentiality. Having explored whether one can survive without the other, I remain uncertain. But I am certain that a balance of values would lead to more fairness and that confidentiality is not the only important ethicalContinue reading “Fair Compensation for Data: Privacy, Blockchain, Ethics, and Data Science Converge”

From OR to EMR: Informed Consent’s Rocky Transition to Data

Hackable Part 4 A hyper-focus on informed consent as the primary tool to ensure autonomy represents some lapses in the field of bioethics. To me, informed consent is more valuable in traditional clinical care or medical research than in engagement with big data. Yet consent is the operational tool behind widespread data collection and theContinue reading “From OR to EMR: Informed Consent’s Rocky Transition to Data”

Hackable: Children’s Digital Literacy and Voluntary Disclosure

(Part 3 of series) Children and young adults spend significant time online using apps that collect massive amounts of information, but they may lack digital literacy. Schools also collect much more information than they used to. The voluntarily divulged information in an online profile plus any hackable identifiable data make children vulnerable to future andContinue reading “Hackable: Children’s Digital Literacy and Voluntary Disclosure”

Voluntariness— Empowering Informed Consent in Medicine, Technology, and Data Privacy

Voluntariness at the time one provides data is an important, overlooked part of providing informed consent. In medicine, informed consent requires voluntariness, yet the on-the-ground experience may reveal pressures to comply. The new landscape of responsible technology, while it incorporates certain types of consent like clicking to accept cookies, needs more definition and clarity aroundContinue reading “Voluntariness— Empowering Informed Consent in Medicine, Technology, and Data Privacy”

Hackable: Schools and Children’s Private Medical Records

Part 2 in a series on privacy The ethics literature on cybersecurity rarely focuses specifically on children’s data stored by or for schools. Critical analysis should inform an ethics debate over the collection, storage, and use of children’s medical records at the foundational level. Hackers have breached vulnerable websites of labs, insurers, and hospitals. WhileContinue reading “Hackable: Schools and Children’s Private Medical Records”

Hackable: The New Privacy Ethics

(a six-post series) Privacy & Disclosure of Personal Data As people spend more time online and using apps that collect massive amounts of information, government entities grapple with how to define and protect privacy through regulation. To deem privacy waived by a click that allows access, e.g., by acknowledging cookies, seems unprincipled. But there isContinue reading “Hackable: The New Privacy Ethics”

Facial Recognition Technology in Medicine: A Use-Based Ethical Framework

Facial recognition technology is everywhere. Pew Research found more than half of adults trust law enforcement with facial recognition but fewer trust tech companies, advertisers, and landlords. The data signifies not only that the user matters, but that use matters. Tracking facial reactions to public ads and displays was the least popular use cited byContinue reading “Facial Recognition Technology in Medicine: A Use-Based Ethical Framework”

Bioethics, Robots, and The Future of Work

Self-driving cars, warehouse robots, EZ-pass, do-it-yourself check-outs, and ATMs threaten the future of work. Work and its many components including pay, atmosphere, feeling of inclusion, and empowerment are social determinants of health. Potential job loss is a valid consideration in ethical arguments to restrict the development or uses of new technologies, yet there is notContinue reading “Bioethics, Robots, and The Future of Work”

Big Data: Reconciling Privacy, Antitrust, and Data-Generating Patents

Data-Generating Patents require a broad ethical approach that incorporates business ethics. Ethics should that adhere to the spirit behind antitrust law and competition to protect consumers. Intellectual property rights are expanding. Data-generating patents can preclude competitors from obtaining, collecting, or generating the same type of data. It also deprives people of control over their dataContinue reading “Big Data: Reconciling Privacy, Antitrust, and Data-Generating Patents”